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Cynthia Nixon Loses New York Primary to Incumbent Governor Andrew Cuomo

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cynthia nixon

Cynthia Nixon’s gubernatorial primary bid against incumbent Andrew Cuomo has come to an end.

Going into the primaries, Cuomo had a greater amount of support from the Democratic party, as well as greater financial resources than Nixon, and pre-primary polls suggested the incumbent governor had more support from New York voters.

The Associated Press called the race for Cuomo based on projected totals at 9:30 p.m. ET. With nearly 50 percent of total votes counted, the 60-year-old career politician held an insurmountable 66.3 percent lead over Nixon’s 33.7 percent.

Following the defeat, Nixon took to Twitter to thank her followers and fans for their support. “Thank you all for believing and fighting and leaving it all on the field,” she wrote. “We started something here in New York, and it doesn’t end today. This is just the beginning. And I know that together, we will win this fight.”

Nixon first announced that she would be running for governor, and challenging the two-term establishment Democrat, in March, when she released a video explaining her motivation and inspiration to throw her hat in the political ring.

“New York is my home. I’ve never lived anywhere else. When I grew up here it was just my mom and me in a one-bedroom, fifth floor walk-up. New York is where I was raised and where I am raising my kids. I’m a proud public school graduate and a prouder public school parent. I was given chances I just don’t see for most of New York’s kids today,” the 51-year-old actress said at the time. “Our leaders are letting us down. We are now the most unequal state in the entire country. With both incredible wealth and extreme poverty… How did we let this happen?”

Nixon first announced that she would be running for governor, and challenging the two-term establishment Democrat, in March, when she released a video explaining her motivation and inspiration to throw her hat in the political ring.

“New York is my home. I’ve never lived anywhere else. When I grew up here it was just my mom and me in a one-bedroom, fifth floor walk-up. New York is where I was raised and where I am raising my kids. I’m a proud public school graduate and a prouder public school parent. I was given chances I just don’t see for most of New York’s kids today,” the 51-year-old actress said at the time. “Our leaders are letting us down. We are now the most unequal state in the entire country. With both incredible wealth and extreme poverty… How did we let this happen?”

ET’s Nischelle Turner was with Parker on Thursday morning, hours before the results of the primary were determined — at the launch of her new brick-and-mortar shoe store, SJP By Sarah Jessica Parker, in the Seaport District of New York City — and the actress-turned-fashion mogul said she was standing by her friend.

“We had to be [at the store opening] super early but we’re we’re gonna go [cast our votes] when I finish,” shared Parker, who said she’d been texting with Nixon the night before the primaries kicked off.

Source: https://www.etonline.com/cynthia-nixon-loses-new-york-primary-to-incumbent-governor-andrew-cuomo-109624

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No love for de Blasio and his millionaires tax in Brooklyn swing district

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cuomo

Mayor Bill de Blasio is counting on a Democrat-dominated Albany to approve his millionaires tax, but judging by only competitive state Senate race in the city, he’ll be waiting for a long time.

Democrat Andrew Gounardes, challenging GOP Sen. Martin Golden in Brooklyn, told Crain’s Wednesday that he is opposed to the mayor’s call to raise the city income tax on individuals earning $500,000 or more and funneling the proceeds to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Both candidates, appearing at a Bay Ridge Council for the Aging forum, voiced general support for Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s counterproposal: charging cars and trucks for entering Midtown and Lower Manhattan.

“I think we need to look at a way that affects people across the board, and I think the most effective way to do that is to lower congestion in the central business district,” said Gounardes, an aide to Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. The candidate added that he would vote no on the heightened excise on high earners.

Gounardes’ comment is unsurprising in some ways and startling in others. The Senate district, comprising a broad, diverse swath of middle-class southern Brooklyn, is center-right in orientation and hostile to the liberal mayor but warm toward the governor. Gounardes received Cuomo’s endorsement the evening before the debate.
But Gounardes also is known to be close to Queens Sen. Michael Gianaris, a fellow Greek-American and chairman of the Democratic State Senate Campaign Committee, who has championed the millionaires tax in the upper chamber.

Citywide polls have shown stronger support for heavier levies on the wealthy than for congestion pricing.

Golden, a 15-year incumbent, indicated he also opposes de Blasio’s solution for subway funding.

Both candidates said they would reject any congestion-pricing plan that did not reduce tolls on MTA spans linking the outer boroughs. One foot of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge sits in the district, and motorists crossing into Staten Island pay the highest tolls in the city.

“I am a definite ‘no’ unless that happens,” Golden said.

Pundits anticipate that local Democrats will ride a wave of antipathy toward the Republican government in Washington and win total control of state government for the first time in a decade. That would require capturing at least one seat currently in GOP hands on Nov. 6.

Democratic gains are expected on Long Island. Progressives in New York City also hope to also dislodge Golden, the lone Republican officeholder in Brooklyn (not including Sen. Simcha Felder, a nominal Democrat who caucuses with the GOP).

Golden—a former police officer, catering hall owner and councilman—has remained in power thanks to strong support from his district’s white ethnic, religious Jewish and Eastern European immigrant communities. The incumbent also has an enormous advantage in fundraising and name recognition. But the district’s demographics are changing, thanks to waves of immigration from Asia, Latin America and the Middle East—and, more recently, influxes of white progressive voters from more expensive sections of Brooklyn.

Source: https://www.crainsnewyork.com/politics/no-love-de-blasio-and-his-millionaires-tax-brooklyn-swing-district

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Street closures, security measures as Trump and other world leaders arrive for UN General Assembly

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trump

President Donald Trump and world leaders are coming together in New York this week for the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly.

New Yorkers are bracing for another week of international bedlam as the General Assembly continues through Oct. 1, with weekdays designated as gridlock alert days.

To ensure the safety of all New Yorkers and world leaders, the NYPD and law enforcement agencies will provide highly trained officers throughout the area.

Heavily armed members of the Joint Terrorism Task Force will be on duty, serving as the first line of defense. Security arsenal will also include aviation and marine units as well as devices to detect chemical or biological weapons.

Alternative modes of transportation are strongly encouraged.

The following traffic advisory has been issued by the NYPD:

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th, 2018

The following streets will have one traffic lane dedicated to emergency vehicles for the duration of the General Assembly:

42nd Street from 1st Avenue to 5th Avenue
57th Street from 2nd Avenue to 5th Avenue
2ndAvenue from 41st Street to 57th Street
The following streets in the vicinity of the United Nations will continued to be closed to vehicular traffic:

1st Avenue from 42nd Street to 48th Street. The tunnel underpass from 41st Street to 48th Street will remain open for passenger cars. Trucks and other large vehicles will not be able to access until the end of each day’s session.
44th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
45th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
46th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
The following will be closed to vehicular traffic beginning at approximately 5:00 a.m.:

42nd Street from the FDR Drive to 2nd Avenue
42nd Street Exit and Entrance Ramps of the FDR Drive
Please note: These areas will reopen each evening after the day’s session.

The following streets will have managed access and no vehicle parking permitted:

Battery Place from Little West Street to Second Place.
1st Place from Battery Place to Little West Street
Little West Street from Battery Place to 2nd Place
50th Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
51st Street from Lexington Avenue to Park Avenue
51st Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
55th Street from Madison Avenue to 5th Avenue
55th Street from 5th Avenue to 6th Avenue
56th Street from 5th Avenue to 6th Avenue
58th Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
58th Street from Plaza to 6th Avenue
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th, 2018

The following streets in the vicinity of the United Nations will continued to be closed to vehicular traffic:

1st Avenue from 42nd Street to 48th Street. The tunnel underpass from 41st Street to 48th Street will remain open for passenger cars. Trucks and other large vehicles will not be able to access until the end of each day’s session.
44th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
45th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
46th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
49th Street from 3rd Avenue to Lexington Avenue
The following streets will have one traffic lane dedicated to emergency vehicles for the duration of the General Assembly:

42nd Street from 1st Avenue to 5th Avenue
57th Street from 2nd Avenue to 5th Avenue
2ndAvenue from 41st Street to 57th Street
The following will be closed to vehicular traffic beginning at approximately 5:00 a.m.:

42nd Street from the FDR Drive to 2nd Avenue
42nd Street Exit and Entrance Ramps of the FDR Drive
Please note: These areas will reopen each evening after the day’s session.

The following streets will have managed access and no vehicle parking permitted:

Battery Place from Little West Street to Second Place.
1st Place from Battery Place to Little West Street
Little West Street from Battery Place to 2nd Place
50th Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
51st Street from Lexington Avenue to Park Avenue
51st Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
55th Street from Madison Avenue to 5th Avenue
55th Street from 5th Avenue to 6th Avenue
56th Street from 5th Avenue to 6th Avenue
58th Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
58th Street from Plaza to 6th Avenue
61st Street from Lexington Avenue to Park Avenue
61st Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
61st Street from Madison Avenue to 5thAvenue
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th, 2018

The following streets will have one traffic lane dedicated to emergency vehicles for the duration of the General Assembly:

42nd Street from 1st Avenue to 5th Avenue
57th Street from 2nd Avenue to 5th Avenue
2ndAvenue from 41st Street to 57th Street
The following streets in the vicinity of the United Nations will continued to be closed to vehicular traffic:

1st Avenue from 42nd Street to 48th Street. The tunnel underpass from 41st Street to 48th Street will remain open for passenger cars. Trucks and other large vehicles will not be able to access until the end of each day’s session.
44th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
45th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
46th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
The following will be closed to vehicular traffic beginning at approximately 5:00 a.m.:

42nd Street from the FDR Drive to 2nd Avenue
42nd Street Exit and Entrance Ramps of the FDR Drive
Please note: These areas will reopen each evening after the day’s session.

The following streets will have managed access and no vehicle parking permitted:

Battery Place from Little West Street to Second Place.
1st Place from Battery Place to Little West Street
Little West Street from Battery Place to 2nd Place
51st Street from Lexington Avenue to Park Avenue
50th Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
51st Street from Lexington Avenue to Park Avenue
51st Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
55th Street from Madison Avenue to 5th Avenue
55th Street from 5th Avenue to 6th Avenue
56th Street from 5th Avenue to 6th Avenue
58th Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
58th Street from Plaza to 6th Avenue
61st Street from Lexington Avenue to Park Avenue
61st Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
61st Street from Madison Avenue to 5thAvenue
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th, 2018

The following streets will have one traffic lane dedicated to emergency vehicles for the duration of the General Assembly:

42nd Street from 1st Avenue to 5th Avenue
57th Street from 2nd Avenue to 5th Avenue
2ndAvenue from 41st Street to 57th Street
The following streets in the vicinity of the United Nations will continued to be closed to vehicular traffic:

1st Avenue from 42nd Street to 48th Street. The tunnel underpass from 41st Street to 48th Street will remain open for passenger cars. Trucks and other large vehicles will not be able to access until the end of each day’s session.
44th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
45th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
46th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
The following will be closed to vehicular traffic beginning at approximately 5:00 a.m.:

42nd Street from the FDR Drive to 2nd Avenue
42nd Street Exit and Entrance Ramps of the FDR Drive
Please note: These areas will reopen each evening after the day’s session.

The FDR DRIVE will be subject to intermittent closures:

Southbound at 63rd Street
Northbound at South Ferry
The following streets will have managed access and no vehicle parking permitted:

Battery Place from Little West Street to Second Place.
1st Place from Battery Place to Little West Street
Little West Street from Battery Place to 2nd Place
50th Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
51st Street from Lexington Avenue to Park Avenue
51st Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
55th Street from Madison Avenue to 5th Avenue
55th Street from 5th Avenue to 6th Avenue
56th Street from 5th Avenue to 6th Avenue
58th Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
58th Street from Plaza to 6th Avenue
61st Street from Lexington Avenue to Park Avenue
61st Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
61st Street from Madison Avenue to 5thAvenue
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th, 2018

The following streets will have one traffic lane dedicated to emergency vehicles for the duration of the General Assembly:

42nd Street from 1st Avenue to 5th Avenue
57th Street from 2nd Avenue to 5th Avenue
2ndAvenue from 41st Street to 57th Street
The following streets in the vicinity of the United Nations will continued to be closed to vehicular traffic:

1st Avenue from 42nd Street to 48th Street. The tunnel underpass from 41st Street to 48th Street will remain open for passenger cars. Trucks and other large vehicles will not be able to access until the end of each day’s session.
44th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
45th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
46th Street from 1st Avenue to 2nd Avenue
The following will be closed to vehicular traffic beginning at approximately 5:00 a.m.:

42nd Street from the FDR Drive to 2nd Avenue
42nd Street Exit and Entrance Ramps of the FDR Drive
Please note: These areas will reopen each evening after the day’s session.

The following streets will have managed access and no vehicle parking permitted:

Battery Place from Little West Street to Second Place.
1st Place from Battery Place to Little West Street
Little West Street from Battery Place to 2nd Place
50th Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
51st Street from Lexington Avenue to Park Avenue
51st Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
55th Street from Madison Avenue to 5th Avenue
55th Street from 5th Avenue to 6th Avenue
56th Street from 5th Avenue to 6th Avenue
58th Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
58th Street from Plaza to 6th Avenue
61st Street from Lexington Avenue to Park Avenue
61st Street from Park Avenue to Madison Avenue
61st Street from Madison Avenue to 5thAvenue

Source: https://pix11.com/2018/09/23/street-closures-for-2018-un-general-assembly/

 

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How the outcome of the AG primary could affect tech in NY

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attorney general eric schneiderman

This week, New York Democrats will line up to vote for one of four candidates vying to replace state Attorney General Barbara Underwood. In doing so, they’ll also decide who will take on the responsibility of regulating the state’s technology industry – a sector that has become an integral part of New York’s economy and increasingly dependent on state policy makers.

Underwood, who was appointed as former Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s replacement after he stepped down in May, has been an advocate for net neutrality on a national level, but has stayed relatively quiet on tech companies’ relationship with New York officials. Schneiderman, on the other hand, had a more complicated relationship with the tech community, taking on sports betting disruptors FanDuel and DraftKings and home-sharing service Airbnb during his tenure.

Now more than ever, the local tech community likely wants an attorney general who will have a proper understanding of the sector and the issues that affect it. Perhaps more importantly, the industry would want the next attorney general to be unaffected by the preferences of groups with roots in the city, and those groups’ relationships with city officials (see: the recent cap on the number of cars licensed by ride-hailing companies like Uber that have disrupted the well-connected New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission).

So how does each Democratic attorney general candidate fare in both categories? Considering the limited conversation around tech during the campaign, it’s hard to say definitively. But their past lives and their responses to a room full of NYC techies during a panel hosted by Axios, Tech:NYC and WeWork back in August provide some details.

Two of the four candidates have actually worked for a technology company. One of them, Leecia Eve, is a lobbyist for Verizon and on leave from her post as its vice president of government affairs for the tri-state region. She said during the panel that she understands “the role of technology better by far than (her) opponents,” alluding to her executive role at a telecommunications company, but her background also puts her in a complicated position. She, like all three of her opponents, presents herself as a strong proponent of net neutrality. “My company, Verizon, has never engaged and never will engage in paid prioritization,” she said at the WeWork panel in August. “No blocking. No throttling.” But Verizon has been called out for that exact offense – and against California firefighters who thought they had unlimited data, no less. Democratic senators in Washington have since asked the FCC to investigate, and while Eve isn’t directly responsible, it does speak to the complicated nature of her loyalties.

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, meanwhile, was the chief operating officer of a New York-based software startup called Kiodex, Inc. from 2000 to 2003. He’s able to speak fluently about the importance of H1B visas to tech companies and of innovation to New York City, spoke most vehemently against the Uber cap during the panel, and told eager attendees more than once that the attorney general should be their partner. He displayed a strong understanding of the issues associated with trying to marry emerging tech with an established (sometimes antiquated) governing system.

“I’ve spent 10 years practicing law in this city … but it doesn’t mean you can’t stand on your own two feet and answer a simple question like whether you support the cap or not,” Maloney said. “Because what’s really going on with that question is whether you support the old school political bosses and political interests in this city or whether you support innovation and you are willing to deal with the disruptions and manage them as you go, because if you put an artificial cap on it, you are going to retard the creative atmosphere that all of you are working so hard to create it. And I’m opposed to it.”

On the other hand, it would be risky to assume that the congressman would prioritize these issues should he win, completely unaffected by the needs or wants of outside groups. “Maloney my guess is probably personally the most pro-tech of that group, so that’s good,” political strategist and venture capitalist Bradley Tusk told City & State. “But you know, he’s also very political.”

With the exception of net neutrality, New York City Public Advocate Letitia James has been perhaps the least committal of the candidates on tech issues. She said she thinks Uber raises a lot of social justice issues but “disagree(s) with the approach of the vote (and) think(s) there should have been more analysis.”

On data privacy, she said she believes in government access to open data to address social justice issues in New York, says it’s important that business disclose what data they gather, and that personal data not be abused and “is clearly protected.”

If Maloney appeared to be the most informed candidate, James came away looking as the least. And aside from presiding over the New York City Council during votes like the one on the Uber cap, her background has little to no connection to the tech industry.

Zephyr Teachout was the only one of the four candidates has explicitly come out in support of the Uber cap bill. “I support the Uber cap bill,” she said on Twitter. “We need to reduce congestion, break up concentrated power, and support drivers. Too many drivers have been squeezed out by big tech companies that steal all the money – and the dignity – from drivers.”

She avoided weighing in on the Uber cap during the WeWork panel, although she was asked many times to take a side. Instead, she repeated the need for an AG to prioritize, outlining her own priorities as being voting, corruption, campaign finance reform and mass incarceration – basically, nothing tech-related. She spoke out forcefully against monopolies too, and expressed her concern about the concentration of tech in New York City.

But when it comes to enforcing the law, Teachout – an associate law professor at Fordham Law School who has never been in elected office or had any company affiliation – gives the tech community reason to think she would regulate fairly. An added advantage? Tim Wu, the man who coined the term “net neutrality,” was her running mate during her 2014 gubernatorial campaign, and her allegiance to net neutrality doesn’t stop there. She told the panel attendees that she “did a crowd-sourced brief defending the open internet” – bonus points for tech lingo.

Source: https://www.cityandstateny.com/articles/politics/campaigns-elections/how-outcome-ag-primaries-could-affect-tech-ny.html

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