Connect with us

Uncategorized

No, the New York Times has not admitted to peddling ‘fake news’ about most recent Kavanaugh claim

Published

on

new york times

The conservative publication PJ Media says in a headline spreading virally on Facebook that the New York Times admitted a new allegation against Justice Brett Kavanaugh is “fake news,” but that is misleading.

The back-and-forth stems from a Sept. 14 report in the New York Times that contains a previously unreported accusation of sexual impropriety by Kavanaugh while a student at Yale.

After its initial reporting, the New York Times added more information to its story online and published an editor’s note explaining its decision.

We’ll walk through what changed in the Times story in a second. But it was not as PJ Media claimed in its headline, “New York Times Now Admits New Kavanaugh Accusation Is Fake News.”

“On Sunday, The New York Times added a retraction to its story attacking Brett Kavanaugh, admitting that the female student allegedly assaulted had no recollection of the event. (Writers) Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly have egg on their faces,” a blurb that ran alongside the PJ Media article reads.

PJ Media’s managing editor Paula Bolyard told us that the PJ Media article was an opinion piece, and said that author Matt Margolis’ use of the phrase “fake news” was a “rhetorical manner of expression.” Bolyard noted that other outlets — among them CNN, The Hill and New York Magazine — referred to the New York Times’ update as a “correction.”

There are elements of opinion in PJ Media’s post, but it’s important for online readers to know that the Times did not retract or reverse its reporting, as PJ Media’s headline suggests.

Error and update

The article in question was adapted from a forthcoming book by New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly, “The Education of Brett Kavanaugh: An Investigation.” The book delves into Kavanaugh’s background, including an alleged pattern of sexual misconduct that first came into public view around the time of Kavanaugh’s contentious Oct. 2018 Supreme Court confirmation hearing.

The Sept. 14, 2019, New York Times article “Brett Kavanaugh Fit In With the Privileged Kids. She Did Not” ignited a firestorm, and even led to some Democratic presidential candidates calling for Kavanaugh’s impeachment.

It depicted a previously unreported scene in which Kavanaugh, then a Yale student in the 1980s, was said to have engaged in lewd conduct at a “drunken dorm party.” Here’s how the account appears in the New York Times; the bolded section was added after the article’s initial publication:

“We also uncovered a previously unreported story about Mr. Kavanaugh in his freshman year that echoes Ms. Ramirez’s allegation. A classmate, Max Stier, saw Mr. Kavanaugh with his pants down at a different drunken dorm party, where friends pushed his penis into the hand of a female student. Mr. Stier, who runs a nonprofit organization in Washington, notified senators and the F.B.I. about this account, but the F.B.I. did not investigate and Mr. Stier has declined to discuss it publicly. We corroborated the story with two officials who have communicated with Mr. Stier; the female student declined to be interviewed and friends say she does not recall the episode.”

And here is the editor’s note the New York Times published Sept. 15, 2019, explaining the change to its story:

“An earlier version of this article, which was adapted from a forthcoming book, did not include one element of the book’s account regarding an assertion by a Yale classmate that friends of Brett Kavanaugh pushed his penis into the hand of a female student at a drunken dorm party. The book reports that the female student declined to be interviewed and friends say that she does not recall the incident. That information has been added to the article.”

Amid the fallout over its reporting, the Times’ deputy editorial page editor James Dao published written answers to five questions from readers, including a question about why the Times decided to print an allegation that some viewed as insufficiently supported. Here’s how Dao responded:

DAO: “The essay included a previously unreported claim that friends pushed Mr. Kavanaugh’s penis into the hand of a female Yale student during a dorm party with drunken classmates. During the authors’ investigation, they learned that a classmate, Max Stier, witnessed the event and later reported it to senators and to the F.B.I. The authors corroborated his story with two government officials, who said they found it credible. Based on that corroboration, we felt mentioning the claim as one part of a broader essay was warranted.”

New York Times spokesperson Danielle Rhoades Ha told PolitiFact the PJ Media headline is “inaccurate,” and added that “the editors’ note is not a retraction in any way.”

Dissecting the change
As the above text shows, the Times’ explanation may call Stier’s allegation into question. But nowhere does the Times admit it peddled “fake news,” which gives the impression of having misled its readers.

For their part, Times’ reporters Kelly and Pogrebin appeared on MSNBC and said the additional details were included in their original draft but were omitted as a result of an editing error. “There was zero intent to mislead anybody about the details of the incident,” Kelly said.

Ha, the Times’ spokesperson, elaborated on this explanation.

“In the original article editors decided not include some information about a female student at Yale that is provided in Kate Kelly and Robin Pogrebin’s book, including her name, in part to protect her privacy because she was not the source for the account in the adaptation,” Ha told PolitiFact. “After publication editors agreed with some readers that the adaptation should include the same information as the book, so the piece was updated.”

The Times also did not retract the article or the specific allegation against Kavanaugh, as PJ Media said. A retraction would include removing the allegation entirely because it cannot be corroborated. The source of this allegation is Max Stier, a classmate of Kavanaugh’s.

In conclusion, the New York Times said it did not initially publish all relevant information when it ran the article, and the omitted information may call into question the credibility of the accusation. But the Times has since added that information, and wrote an editor’s note explaining their decision.

The Times has not retracted its reporting on the allegation or admitted it was incorrect. Sites claiming so have gone too far.

Source: https://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2019/sep/18/no-new-york-times-has-not-admitted-peddling-fake-n/

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Uncategorized

Toxic Metals Found in 95% of Baby Foods

Published

on

By

Baby Foods

Rice-based products were found to have the highest levels of arsenic, the study commissioned by Healthy Babies Bright Futures found

A disturbing new study might have parents triple-checking the labels of their baby food.

Commissioned by Healthy Babies Bright Futures (HBBF) and conducted by Abt Associates, the study found that of the baby foods it tested, 95 percent were found to contain toxic chemicals, including arsenic and lead.

Of the popular store brands tested, one in four contained toxic chemicals, the study found. In addition to arsenic and lead, cadmium and mercury were also found.

Of the 168 baby foods tested for the study, rice-based products posed one of the biggest threats.

“Puffs and other snacks made with rice flour contain arsenic, lead and cadmium at relatively high levels compared to other baby foods,” the study said, while “teething biscuits and rice rusks often contain arsenic, lead, and cadmium.”

But the number one culprit for arsenic in infants’ diets? Infant rice cereal, the study found.

“Rice is a leading source of arsenic exposure for young children,” the report stated, suggesting parents instead serve their children “other grains like oats, wheat and barley instead of rice to help cut their family’s exposures.”

But if parents are using rice-based foods, it is suggested that the rice be cooked in extra water “that is poured off before serving,” which can “cut the arsenic levels by up to 60 percent, according to FDA studies (FDA 2016).”

Basmati rice grown in California, India, and Pakistan has the lowest arsenic levels, while rice from Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, “or simply ‘U.S.’” has the highest levels, the study said. That data was based on testing by Consumer Reports, the study said.

In addition to rice-based products, other problematic foods included apple, pear, grape and other fruit juices as well as carrots and sweet potatoes, which “contain higher levels of lead and cadmium than other fruits and vegetables, on average.”

HBBF encouraged parents to provide their children with tap water and a variety of fruits and vegetables to avoid risk of exposure to the harmful toxins.

The organization warned that the chemicals in question “can permanently alter the developing brain, erode IQ, and affect behavior.”

 

Source people.com

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

3 killed in multi-vehicle crash on I-80 in NJ: authorities

Published

on

By

Accident • Christopher Columbus Highway

PARSIPPANY, N.J. — Three people are dead after a major multi-vehicle crash on the Interstate 80 highway in New Jersey early Friday, authorities confirmed.

State troopers responded around 1:45 a.m. for a crash involving at least two vehicles in the eastbound express lanes of I-80 in Parsippany-Troy Hills in Morris County, according to the New Jersey State Police.

Authorities confirmed there were at least three fatalities in the crash but had no further information about the deadly incident or the victims’ identities.

The eastbound express lanes remain closed while authorities investigate the accident.

PIX11 News was on the scene early Friday and witnessed two cars that were involved, including one turned on its side with extensive damage.

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

Potential Tropical Cyclone 16 likely to become tropical storm today; warnings issued for parts of Florida

Published

on

By

Potential Tropical Cyclone

A disturbance in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, Potential Tropical Storm 16, strengthened overnight and is expected to become a tropical or subtropical storm today, the National Hurricane Center said Friday.

At 5 a.m. (EDT) Friday, the disturbance was located about 390 miles southwest of the mouth of the Mississippi River with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph. The system was moving toward the northeast at 14 mph.

“The disturbance is expected to develop into a tropical or subtropical storm later today, and a slow strengthening is then anticipated. An Air Force plane will investigate the disturbance again in a few hours,” Senior Hurricane Specialist Lixion Avila wrote in Friday morning’s advisory.

Typically, a maximum sustained wind speed of 39 mph is when a tropical storm is designated, but so far “there is no evidence that a well-defined center has formed yet,” the hurricane center said.

If and when it becomes a tropical storm, and if no other storms form elsewhere in the Atlantic sooner, it would be named Nestor.

“On the forecast track, the system will approach the northern Gulf Coast later today and tonight, and then move over portions of the southeastern United States on Saturday,” Avila wrote. By early Saturday, the system is expected to be approaching the western Part of Florida’s Panhandle.

That part of Florida is still recovering from the devastation wrought by the Category 5 Hurricane Michael, which obliterated Mexico Beach a year ago, in October 2018.

As of Friday morning, a tropical storm warning was in effect from the Mississippi-Alabama border to the Ochlockonee River in Florida. The mouth of the Ochlockonee River is about 30 miles south of Tallahassee.

A tropical storm warning was also in effect from Grand Isle, Louisiana, about 50 miles south of New Orleans, to the mouth of the Pearl River at the Mississippi-Louisiana border.

A tropical storm watch was in effect from the area east of the Ochlockonee River to Yankeetown, Florida.

Tropical storm warnings mean that tropical storm conditions are expected. Watches mean that tropical storm conditions are possible.

 

Source sun-sentinel.com

Continue Reading

Trending

TransportationVoice