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What steps transportation companies should take in 2018. Part 1. Facebook

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So, what is ahead in 2018? People will more often choose proven products and services and stop trusting companies that do not keep up with the times. When people leave negative reviews and don’t get any feedback they start looking for another service that will stay in touch with clients and solve their problems. It is very relevant for transportation companies.

One of the biggest trends of 2018 is the automation of transportation services. Many companies outside the state of New York have reacted to the changes in clients’ loyalty. Whereas previously it was enough to just provide quality service, nowadays clients want to know public opinion and they want the company to be well-known. In 2018 it will be more difficult to keep your clients. Besides, many companies will need a new customer flow. And here is where social networks will help. Let’s take a closer look at this phenomenon.

The pros of social media:

  • Advertising of your service
  • Positive reviews from the clients that you already have
  • Attracting new clients
  • Enhancing credibility of your services
  • Company’s visibility

and many others.

Facebook. This social network has over 2 billion users. 81% of the US population has their page on Facebook. This is a huge advertisement platform with a lot of features. If you maintain your company page correctly you will be able to keep the trust of the clients you already have and attract a flow of new clients. Hiring an SMM specialist that will maintain your page costs a lot of money, and this is entirely justified. But if you have decided to maintain your page by yourself here are a few pieces of advice:

The first and the main advice: you are not the one who should like your social page, nor your relatives or your better half. People should like it! So in the beginning don’t be shy and ask around about how your page looks like in the eyes of others. So, the first step is creating a business page. Facebook has produced a clear instruction about how to create a page and describe it, but you should remember that when people come to your page they need to understand what kind of services you provide.

Secondly, the content of your page. Right away it should be noted that if you have chosen a more economical way of creating your brand awareness in social networks you will be the one to maintain this page, because unexperienced young staff that have no idea about SMM may damage your business. We can give a lot of examples about how this could be done, but the main advice for the newbies is to write about your business, its services and news sincerely. We should also mention visual design of your page: it must be simple and tasteful. If you have decided to put your company logo on Facebook avatar then make it the right size using online or offline graphic instruments. This also applies to any pictures that you post with the news.

Thirdly, analytics. Facebook provides very good and detailed analytics instruments. You can check what post or news was successful with the audience. If you apply analytics correctly you will easily understand how to make your Facebook page successful.

The first step to promoting your Facebook page is asking your employees, relatives and friends to refer others to your social media page. This is a very important step. And the main thing: your clients will start communication with you on your page. Be responsive, be attentive and open. If you are friendly, people will choose your service over others.

Read more about this topic in our other articles.

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5 Stocks To Watch For January 14, 2019

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Some of the stocks that may grab investor focus today are:

  • Wall Street expects Citigroup Inc. C 0.05% to report quarterly earnings at $1.55 per share on revenue of $17.59 billion before the opening bell. Citigroup shares rose 0.28 percent to $56.85 in after-hours trading.
  • Yeti Holdings Inc YETI raised its forecast for the year. The company said it projects full-year adjusted earnings of $0.88 to $0.90 per share, versus earlier forecast of $0.79 to $0.82 per share, and sales of $778.8 million. Yeti shares jumped 10.83 percent to $18.53 in the after-hours trading session.
  • Stein Mart, Inc.  SMRT 0.81% reported a 3.3 percent drop in its comparable stores sales for the nine-week period ended January 5, 2019 on a shifted basis. Stein Mart shares tumbled 11.29 percent to $1.10 in the after-hours trading session.
  • Analysts are expecting Shaw Communications Inc.  SJR 0.05% to have earned $0.22 per share on revenue of $1.01 billion in the latest quarter. Shaw Communications shares rose 1.57 percent to $20.00 in after-hours trading.
  • Boot Barn Holdings Inc  BOOT issued strong forecast for the third quarter. The company said it expects Q3 sales of $254 million and earnings of $0.66 per share. Boot Barn shares surged 5 percent to $20.36 in the after-hours trading session.

Source: https://www.benzinga.com/news/earnings/19/01/12975961/5-stocks-to-watch-for-january-14-2019

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How to Write a Recommendation on LinkedIn

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YOU’VE BEEN ASKED TO give LinkedIn recommendations to former colleagues. The pressure is on: Unlike a traditional letter of reference shared with specific employers or hiring teams regarding a particular position, LinkedIn recommendations are public and available to your entire professional network via social media. The approach you take to writing a recommendation on LinkedIn might seriously affect the professional reputation of the person you’re reviewing – for better or worse.

Assuming your goal is to help the person you’re recommending, writing a strong LinkedIn recommendation can boost the candidate’s credentials in the eyes of recruiters, hiring managers and professional peers.

“Recommendations for a candidate are an additional bonus, a cherry on top,” says Alan Fluhrer, talent acquisition manager at W.E. O’Neil Construction. “Just like having a photo increases your chance of getting a contact, a few recommendations add to a person’s credibility.”

Although Fluhrer notes that he reads all LinkedIn profiles of interest to him whether or not they contain recommendations, he explains that “they can only help.”

With this in mind, consider the following pointers to help you deliver an effective and powerful LinkedIn recommendation to colleagues and others with whom you’ve truly enjoyed working.
How to Write a Recommendation on LinkedIn:

  • Keep it short, significant and specific.
  • Share results, work style and attitude.
  • Consider letting the recipient draft the recommendation.
  • Post your LinkedIn recommendation
  • Keep it short, significant and specific.

Some well-meaning recommendations are nonetheless cringeworthy. The source of the discomfort these cause may be insufficient significance or specificity. Recommendations that highlight underwhelming qualities (“Dustin always arrived on time to work”) or sound generic (“Martha was a reliable employee”) leave readers feeling flat.
Since there’s a 3,000-character limit on LinkedIn recommendations, it’s important to make every word count. Don’t waste your review time sharing basic facts expected in any job. Instead, think of specific strengths that really make the person stand out – for example, that he’s the most responsive communicator you’ve ever worked with, or that she consistently met your department’s goals, below budget.
Share results, work style and attitude.

When you’re in the position to hire someone and are reviewing multiple candidates’ credentials online, you want to get a clear sense of what each person would really be like in the role. You want to know what he or she offers in terms of personal character and professional credentials.

Focusing on the trio of results, work style and attitude can help you strike this balance in a short space. Quantifying a specific outcome that you experienced with your colleague, such as that she designed an award-winning marketing campaign that won your company new business, provides tangible support to back your belief in her.

With results as the centerpiece of your review, you can then ice the cake by briefly describing what you liked about working with the person. Was she someone you could rely on under pressure or in a pinch? Did he make it his mantra to go above and beyond with each project? Give people a taste of the treat you had in working with your co-worker to make it obvious why this person is such a great catch.

Attitude is part of work style, and it’s something essential to most employers. No matter how technically proficient someone is, if she isn’t collaborative, collegial and otherwise great to work with, then she isn’t a great hire. If you appreciated the person’s positive attitude, emphasize that point.
Consider letting the recipient draft the recommendation.

A common practice in writing traditional letters of recommendation is to ask the recipient of the review to write a first draft of what he or she would like you to state in your recommendation. This strategy also works for LinkedIn recommendations, so if you’re busy, it’s fair to request a draft from the person you’re recommending. You have no obligation to post this suggested language, but using this approach saves you time while allowing your colleague to home in on exactly which points he or she hopes you will mention.

Ask the recipient to provide you with the draft outside of the LinkedIn platform so that you can offer edits if needed. Once you and the candidate have agreed on the language that you’ll use, then you can post the recommendation on LinkedIn.
Post your LinkedIn recommendation.

To post your recommendation, click the “more” button on the profile of a first-degree LinkedIn connection, then select “recommend.” Fill out the “relationship” and “position” fields, then click “next.” Type in your recommendation, and then click “send.”

Keep in mind that on this specific social media platform, each member can opt whether or not to display a LinkedIn recommendation she receives, so if you write one that’s not to the recipient’s liking and she hides it, you’ve wasted your time. To that point, if you don’t feel you can give a strong enough recommendation to someone who has requested one, you’re better off declining the ask.

Source: https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/articles/how-to-write-a-recommendation-on-linkedin

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The right way to fire an employee

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There’s nothing fun about the firing process: whether you’re giving or getting the news.

“No one likes to fire people, it doesn’t matter how successful or high up they are,” said Kristi Hedges, leadership coach and author of The Power of Presence.

But having to let workers go comes with the territory of being an employer.

And while there are a host of legal issues surrounding how to properly lay off a worker, experts said there are also practical and emotional considerations to take into account when delivering the news.

Don’t surprise them

If a worker is being fired for poor performance, it shouldn’t be a surprise.

Hold regular employee reviews to go over any areas that need improvement, experts recommended. They don’t need to be super formal, but it allows workers time to improve or refocus.

Some states have what’s called at-will employment, which means workers can be fired at any time for any legal reason, but that doesn’t make it a good business practice.

“Legally you may be able to do that, but in many cases, firing an employee without having any reason — especially if it is for performance with no feedback or no indication of doing something — that is not a good way to operate a business,” said Dan Ryan, founder of Ryan Search & Consulting.

If the termination is due to a business model change, try to give affected workers as much notice as possible.

“Sometimes business necessities don’t allow [for a heads up] or for safety reasons you may not want to, each case is different,” said Paula Harvey, vice president of human resources at Schulte Building Systems in Texas. “Make a good decision on how to handle the terminations.”

Do it face to (familiar) face

Firing someone is always going to be uncomfortable. But it needs to happen in person, the experts agreed. Not over the phone, via email or blasted out on Twitter.

“We pick up a lot more information when someone is in front of us,” said Hedges. “You can see body language, feel the energy in the room and react better. It’s a sign of courtesy to let someone go face to face.

She added that it’s best to have the direct manager be the one delivering the news. “If management is having a talk with you, that is a level of intimacy and personal care,” she said. “If you are kicked over to HR to someone you don’t interact with, that sets a different tone.”

Experts also recommended having another person in the room, preferably from human resources, that can serve both as a witness or to help with any unusual reactions or questions.

Be clear and concise

Now’s not the time to wing it. What you say and how you break the news is important when letting an employee go.

Make sure you know exactly why you’re firing a worker, have specific examples and bring the proper documentation. That includes copies of performance reports, any write-ups and applicable financial forms like unemployment insurance and health insurance and 401(k) options.

Be firm and clear in the delivery of the termination and the path forward. “There is no room or need to get into a protracted discussion,” said Ryan. “It is what it is, there is no productive discussion that can take place after.”

Be prepared for emotion, but keep yours in check

Some workers take the news in stride. Others might go through a range of emotions: shock, grief and sometimes anger.

“Show empathy,” said Ryan, but be careful about any physical contact.

Harvey advised against using any harsh words or mean emotions during the termination. “You may be upset that they didn’t perform at the point you hoped, but it doesn’t do you any good. Just say, ‘This is it, we made this decision and we wish you well on your way.'”

Give them a soft landing

For workers who are being let go for non-performance issues, help make the transition as seamless as possible, Hedges recommended.

She said some companies offer employees a long lead time to give them a chance to find a new job or offer some consulting work for the company to help make the transition as smooth as possible.

Be honest with employees

If there is a big round of layoffs, don’t leave employees in the dark. And if word starts spreading about people losing their jobs, move swiftly.

“That kind of rumor mill can be detrimental to those involved, especially if your name is being circulated as on the chopping block,’ said Ryan.

Try to make the cuts all at once, Hedges advised.

“Go deep the first time. It’s better to let more people go at once then to do it over three stages. It prolongs the pain. The worst thing a manger can do when answering whether more layoffs are coming is to say, ‘I don’t know, we will have to see.'”

Once the cuts have been made, be transparent and offer a sense of security to remaining workers.

“If the rest of company doesn’t know what’s going on and the only way to retrieve information is back channel rumors, that crates havoc,” said Hedges.

from money.cnn website

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